Who’s pulling you over? : N.C. Sheriff arrested for plot to murder Deputy

Granville County Sheriff Brindell Wilkins

Don’t be afraid of the man with the gun when he pulls you over. He is a hero who risks his life every day. He is part of the thin blue line that keeps anarchy at bay. And just remember, what is really important; that he goes home safe every day. A hero, for sure until his badge and mask are off.   Remember this guy anytime you hear sworn testimony from a cop. The cop is probably far more likely to be lying than the defendant

“A North Carolina sheriff was  suspended Monday after he was arrested last week for allegedly encouraging another man to kill a former deputy who had an audio recording of him making “racially insensitive” comments.

Granville County Sheriff Brindell Wilkins, the county’s top lawman since 2009, was removed from his post at the request of county attorney James Wrenn, who filed a petition for the sheriff’s suspension, according to CNN.

Wilkins and his lawyer agreed to the move.

The sheriff last Monday was charged with two felony counts of obstruction of justice after he allegedly told an unidentified man in 2014 that he wanted former deputy Joshua Freeman dead, according to an indictment.

“The only way you gonna stop him is kill him,” Wilkins purportedly told the man during a recorded phone call regarding the alleged plan, which was ultimately not put into action.

In 2014, Wilkins learned that Freeman said he had a recording of the sheriff using “racially insensitive language,” which the deputy planned to release to authorities, according to the indictment.

Prosecutors claim that Wilkins’ “personal animosity” toward Freeman motivated him during an August 2014 recorded call to tell the unnamed would-be shooter to kill the deputy, clearly making his intentions known of not protecting Freeman or stopping the plot, the indictment states.

“If you need to take care of somethin’, just take care of something,” Wilkins told the man, according to the indictment.

The aspiring killer even gave Wilkins a time and location for when he planned to kill Freeman, as well as the type of firearm he intended to use. In response, Wilkins “counseled the individual how to commit murder” in a way to avoid being identified, including hiding the weapon used to kill Freeman and to simply keep quiet, the indictment continues.

“You ain’t got the weapon, you ain’t got nothing to go on,” Wilkins allegedly told the man before advising him to stay mum after the killing. “The only way we find out these murder things is people talk. You can’t tell nobody nothin’, not a thing.”

Original here : https://nypost.com/2019/09/23/sheriff-suspended-for-alleged-plot-to-have-former-deputy-killed/

Who’s pulling you over? : Decorated St. Pete police officer arrested for child porn

Feel safe yet? Feel like getting pulled over on a dark highway? The thin blue line that protects us from anarchy…. And our children.   Do you ever wonder who the man behind the gun is? That sworn officer of the court, who’s word is given the weight of truth by a judge?   Well, we now know who this guy is; His badge and his mask are off. A real hero he was ; He managed to kill an 18 yr. old with his shotgun in a shoot out and got the highest award available. Wow! Color me impressed.

A police officer was arrested Thursday by Department of Homeland Security agents who said they discovered child pornography on his computer.

Officer Matthew Enhoffer, 33, is also accused of distributing pornographic images via text message, according to federal court records.

Following his arrest, the St. Petersburg Police Department placed Enhoffer on administrative leave without pay pending the outcome of the federal investigation. He had been placed on administrative leave with pay last week after federal agents raided his home on Sept. 11.

“It’s a shock for us at the police department,” said police Chief Tony Holloway. “The community does put a lot of trust in us. We have to earn that trust back with them. We’re just going to continue to keep building a relationship with our community.”

In 2015, Holloway stood on stage and handed Enhoffer the department’s highest honor, the Medal of Valor. The award stemmed from a May 17, 2015, shootout officers had with an armed 18-year-old. The gunman shot at Enhoffer, then shot and wounded another officer in the leg.

The gunman fired at Enhoffer a second time, who then fired his shotgun at the 18-year-old, fatally wounding him.

“He was an officer that risked his life when it was needed,” the chief said, “but at the same time this allegation is very serious so we’re looking into that.”

https://www.tampabay.com/news/crime/2019/09/19/decorated-st-petersburg-officer-faces-child-porn-charges/

 

Who’s pulling you over? : Wash. police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

    It begs the question; What the hell is wrong with this guy? Well, I think it is self evident that someone doesn’t wake up one day and say that they want to spend their working career controlling others.    What type of person wants to be the cop? In My graduating class it was all of the bullies. You know, the guys who only wanted to prey on people weaker than themselves. They would never stand up in a fair fight if the odds weren’t stacked in their favor.    I don’t think it is coincidence that cops are 2 to 4 times more likely to commit domestic battery (And half as likely to be prosecuted) * (1)    So, what the Hell is wrong with this guy?  Well do the math and really wonder the next time you see cherries lighting up your dashboard ” Who’s pulling me over ?”

RENTON, Wash. — New court documents are giving more details about what led up to a Renton police officer being arrested in Des Moines early Saturday morning.

King County prosecutors officially filed charges of assault and abuse of office against Officer Tanuj Soni.

The victim told investigators Soni texted her to meet him before dawn Saturday saying he wanted to talk about a case involving her ex-boyfriend.

When a friend dropped her off, the victim says Soni was waiting with a bottle of wine and two cups.

The victim says they spent a couple of hours drinking. During that time, she says Soni deleted some messages on her phone and told her to take off her clothes.

The victim says she willingly did that but then Soni started hitting her and that’s when she tried to get out of the situation.

Just before 6 a.m., the victim managed to run to a nearby home where she contacted authorities. Prosecutors asked a judge for $100,000 bail on concerns about the accusations against Soni. They added that Soni may have covered his tracks when the victim accused him of deleting messages off her phone.”

Renton police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

 

Who’s pulling you over? Who are the soldiers of the police state?

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Posted by Deborah Lee Jarrett

Seriously, who is the person who is pulling over? You know nothing about them or their moral character. All you know is that your heart rate jumped to 120 when you saw lights in your rear view. This person has a badge and a gun and is backed by plenty of other cops and the court system.    Your freedom and life , from the very first moment you interact with them, are at risk. Just because they are sworn officers of the court and enforcers of the law, does not cover the character flaws that drive so many to enter law enforcement. Many are people with issues of control and power. These issues show in their professional interactions and often spill over into their personal lives.  For example:

National center for women  and policing

“Two studies have found that at least 40% of police officer families experience domestic violence, (1, 2) in contrast to 10% of families in the general population.(3) A third study of older and more experienced officers found a rate of 24% (4), indicating that domestic violence is 2-4 times more common among police families than American families in general. A police department that has domestic violence offenders among its ranks will not effectively serve and protect victims in the community.5, 6, 7, 8 Moreover, when officers know of domestic violence committed by their colleagues and seek to protect them by covering it up, they expose the department to civil liability.7

Domestic violence is always a terrible crime, but victims of a police officer are particularly vulnerable because the officer who is abusing them:

  • has a gun,
  • knows the location of battered women’s shelters, and
  • knows how to manipulate the system to avoid penalty and/or shift blame to the victim.5, 6

Victims often fear calling the police, because they know the case will be handled by officers who are colleagues and/or friends of their abuser. Victims of police family violence typically fear that the responding officers will side with their abuser and fail to properly investigate or document the crime.5, 7

These suspicions are well founded, as most departments across the country typically handle cases of police family violence informally, often without an official report, investigation, or even check of the victim’s safety.5, 8, 9 This “informal” method is often in direct contradiction to legislative mandates and departmental policies regarding the appropriate response to domestic violence crimes. Moreover, a 1994 nationwide survey of 123 police departments documented that almost half (45%) had no specific policy for dealing with officer-involved domestic violence. In that same study:

  • The most common discipline imposed for a sustained allegation of domestic violence was counseling.
  • Only 19% of the departments indicated that officers would be terminated after a second sustained allegation of domestic violence.9
  • A recent study of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department found inconsistent policies and practices for officers accused of domestic violence, regarding arrests, seizure of firearms, and Employee Assistance treatment.10 There is no reason to believe that the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department is unique in this; rather, this inconsistency is typical for police agencies responding to domestic violence committed by its own members.

Although the International Association of Chiefs of Police have prepared a model policy on police officer-involved domestic violence, there is no evidence that police departments across the country are doing anything other than simply including the policy in their manuals.

The reality is that even officers who are found guilty of domestic violence are unlikely to be fired, arrested, or referred for prosecution, raising concern that those who are tasked with enforcing the law cannot effectively police themselves.5, 6, 7 For example:

  • In 1998-1999, 23 domestic violence complaints were filed against Boston police employees, but none resulted in criminal prosecution.6
  • The San Diego City Attorney typically prosecutes 92% of the domestic violence cases that are referred, but only 42% of the cases involving a police officer as the perpetrator are prosecuted.11
  • Between 1990 and 1997, the Los Angles Police Department investigated 227 cases of alleged domestic violence by officers, of which 91 were sustained. Of these 91 allegations that were sustained by the department, only 4 resulted in a criminal conviction. That means that the LAPD itself determined in 91 cases that an officer had committed domestic violence, but only 4 were convicted on a criminal charge. Moreover, of these 4 officers who were convicted on a criminal charge of domestic violence, one was suspended for only 15 days and another had his conviction expunged.12

In fact, an in-depth investigation of the Los Angeles Police Department conducted by the Office of the Inspector General concluded that the discipline imposed on officers found guilty of domestic violence “was exceedingly light when the facts of each incident were examined” (p. i).12

The study of the Los Angeles Police Department further examined the 91 cases in which an allegation of domestic violence was sustained against an officer.

  • Over three-fourths of the time, this sustained allegation was not mentioned in the officer’s performance evaluation.
  • Twenty-six of these officers (29%) were promoted, including six who were promoted within two years of the incident.

The report concluded that “employees with sustained allegations were neither barred from moving to desired positions nor transferred out of assignments that were inconsistent with the sustained allegation” (p. iii).12

In 1997, the Los Angeles Office of the Inspector General conducted an investigation of the LAPD after a legal consultant named Bob Mullally leaked shocking LAPD personnel files to the press. These files documented scores of violent domestic crimes committed by LAPD officers. Mullally was so shocked by the LAPD’s mishandling of this police family violence that he decided to violate the civil protective order in the case he was working on and turn the files over to the media, in the hopes of creating change in the LAPD.

  • Rather than reviewing the problem or recommending improvements, the LAPD sued Mullally for leaking the information.
  • In 2002, after multiple appeals, Mullally was sentenced to 45 days in federal prison. None of the police officers he exposed were ever prosecuted for their crimes, and many continue to serve as gun-carrying LAPD officers.
    Even the prosecutor in the case stated on record that this sentence was “extreme” for a violation of a civil protective order.
  • Mullally is the first person in United States history to ever serve a jail term for this type of violation. He served his time in 2003, 6 years after he exposed the files.

More at the original : http://womenandpolicing.com/violenceFS.asp#notes

  • Footnotes

    1 Johnson, L.B. (1991). On the front lines: Police stress and family well-being. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families House of Representatives: 102 Congress First Session May 20 (p. 32-48). Washington DC: US Government Printing Office.

    2 Neidig, P.H., Russell, H.E. & Seng, A.F. (1992). Interspousal aggression in law enforcement families: A preliminary investigation. Police Studies, Vol. 15 (1), p. 30-38.

    3 Straus, M. & Gelles, R. (1990). Physical violence in American families – risk factors and adaptations to violence in 8,145 families. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

    4 P.H. Neidig, A.F. Seng, and H.E. Russell, “Interspousal Aggression in Law Enforcement Personnel Attending the FOP Biennial Conference,” National FOP Journal. Fall/Winter 1992, 25-28.

    5 Levinson, A. (June 29, 1997). Abusers behind a badge. Arizona Republic.

    6 Police departments fail to arrest policemen for wife abuse (November 15, 1998). The Boston Globe.

    7 Feltgen, J. (October, 1996). Domestic violence: When the abuser is a police officer. The Police Chief, p. 42-49.

    8 Lott, L.D. (November, 1995). Deadly secrets: Violence in the police family. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, p. 12-16.

    9 Arlington, Texas Police Department and Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute (1995). Domestic assaults among police: A survey of internal affairs policies. Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute.

    10 Cassidy, M., Nicholl, C.G. & Ross, C.R. (2001). Results of a Survey Conducted by the Metropolitan Police Department of Victims who Reported Violence Against Women. Executive Summary published by the DC Metropolitan Police Department.

    11 Thornton, K. (May 11, 1998). Police and domestic violence. San Diego Union-Tribune.

    12 Domestic Violence Task Force (1997). Domestic Violence in the Los Angeles Police Department: How Well Does the Los Angeles Police Department Police Its Own? Office of the Inspector General.

    13 Omnibus Appropriations Bill (H.R. 4278), Section 658.

    14 Kime, R.C. (December, 1996). New federal gun ban tied to domestic violence convictions. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    15 Culp, M.H. (March, 2000). Officer-involved orders for protection: A management challenge. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    16 Ed Meyer et al. (1999, December 5). Few lose jobs. Akron Beacon Journal.

    17 Model policy overlooks views of Chicago’s in-house expert (April 30, 1998). Law Enforcement News, p. 9.

    18 Tobar, H. (May 26, 1997). Officer’s expunged conviction angers ex-wife. Los Angeles Times.

    19 Tobar, H. (May 9, 1997). 3 Deputies go to court, regain right to carry guns. Los Angeles Times.

    20 Records deleted in assault case involving Louisville policeman. (November 1, 2001). Louisville Courier Journal.

Coward of Broward arrested on multiple felony and misdemeanor counts relating to hiding during Parkland Florida shooting

mike brown america GIF

It’s real easy being a tough guy when you are all vested up and dealing with an unarmed person. As long as you have forty others to get your back, being the big dog is fun.    Old ladies, teenage girls, speeders and the occasional shop lifter give cops plenty of room to feel empowered without back up (And their spouses on Saturday night).       But let’s make it Mano E Mano and see what happens.In the normal Cop world they always win because they can call in 800 reserve cops, snipers, APC’s and SWAT teams. Barring that working they can have the Governor call in national guard troops.     But when the chips are down, what will those hired to protect and serve do?  Without back up who are they?  If they don’t have muscle memory to be the better shooter, what will they do?         Ask the Parkland parents; they know. A bunch of cops with less balls than a 19 Yr. old demented punk.

 Bully:

1.
seek to harm, intimidate, or coerce (someone perceived as vulnerable).
“her 11- year-old son has been constantly bullied at school”
synonyms: persecuteoppresstyrannizetormentbrowbeatintimidatecowcoercestrong-armsubjugatedomineer;

Worthless scumbag cowards

From PINAC

By Carlos Miller

6/04/2019

“The arrest comes more than a year after the shooting at Marjorie Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland.

Multiple felony charges of child endangerment were filed Tuesday against the former Broward County sheriff’s deputy who hid while a man gunned down 17 students at a South Florida high school last year.

Scot Peterson, who was the school resource officer on duty on February 14, 2018, was terminated for his inaction along with a sergeant named Brian Miller.

But now the Florida Department of Law Enforcement has concluded its investigation and have charged Peterson with seven counts of neglect of a child, three counts of culpable negligence, and one count of perjury.

He was arrested Tuesday, according to WPTV.

“The FDLE investigation shows former Deputy Peterson did absolutely nothing to mitigate the MSD shooting that killed 17 children, teachers and staff and injured 17 others,” said Florida Department of Law Enforcement Commissioner Rick Swearingen. “There can be no excuse for his complete inaction and no question that his inaction cost lives.”

The fallout from the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland resulted in Broward County Sheriff Scott Israel being removed by Florida Governor Ron DeSantis and replaced by Gregory Tony.

“We cannot fulfill our commitment to always protect the security and safety of our Broward County community without doing a thorough assessment of what went wrong that day,” Sheriff Tony told WPTV. “I am committed to addressing deficiencies and improving the Broward Sheriff’s Office.”

However, the United States Supreme Court ruled in 2005 that cops do not have a Constitutional duty to protect citizens.

 Original Here: https://newsmaven.io/pinacnews/cops-in-cuffs/coward-from-broward-deputy-arrested-for-hiding-during-parkland-school-shooting-QHqZ9xnGykOjfsqq4me2Gw/

Hero of the week : Cop arrested for child rape

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Posted by Deborah Jarrett

WYANDOTTE COUNTY, KS (KCTV) – A Wyandotte County deputy was booked into jail midday Tuesday on charges of rape and sexual exploitation of a child.

Michael Mastel,52, is charged with raping someone under the age of 14. Prosecutors said the criminal actions were all involving a single victim.

Wyandotte County Sheriff’s Office District Attorney Mark Dupree said the incidents happened at least three times from December 2011 and between March and June of last year. The victim came forward to tell what happened and authorities got involved.

“The defendant is alleged to have committed these acts with a child he knew and interacted with not in the course of his work with the sheriff’s office,” Dupree said.

Mastel began working for the sheriff’s office in August of 2008 and is now on administrative leave without pay.

https://www.kctv5.com/news/local_news/wyandotte-county-deputy-arrested-on-charges-of-rape-involving-child/article_b5ca8d0a-6083-11e9-b7d2-fbba86da8256.html

Hypocrites in blue : DWI taskforce Cop arrested for DUI with live PD officer in passenger seat

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And that is how it goes; If you are not a cop then you are scum or a dirtbag. But it is just fine for them to do it as long as they don’t run into a parked car.    This is the caliber of who is now patrolling our streets. They are no longer here to serve and protect. They are now a domestic military force charged to subdue and profit.

As such they believe themselves to be above the average citizen and too good to follow the laws that they are tasked with enforcing.    If this doesn’t change, it is going to get much worse before it gets better.

“EL PASO, Texas (KTSM) – An off-duty El Paso Police Department officer was arrested Sunday morning on suspicion of driving while intoxicated, while another officer was in the passenger seat.

Thomas Sneed, 38, was arrested at about 2:32 a.m. on March 9 following an accident in the 2300 block of Piedras.

A police department news release said Sneed was driving a Dodge Ram pickup truck north on Piedras when it hit a Mazda 3, which was parked. The Mazda had two men inside it, but they were not injured, the release said.

The passenger, 34-year-old Andrea Zendejas who was a regular officer on A&E’s Live PD, was taken to the hospital with minor injuries, the release said.

Officer noticed that Sneed was allegedly intoxicated and he was placed under arrested and booked into the El Paso County Jail.

According to police, Sneed is a two and a half year veteran of the department and was assigned to its DWI Taskforce on a temporary rotation earlier this year.”