Who’s pulling you over? : Deputy Police Chief Arrested on Child Pornography Charges

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State Police say 28-year-old Joel Archambault is facing charges of promotion of sexual performance by a child and possession of sexual performance by a child.

Authorities say Archambault downloaded and shared images consistent with child sexual exploitation online.

As well as serving in his role as deputy chief for SUNY System Plaza, Archambault is also a part-time member of the Whitehall Police Department.

In a statement, SUNY officials say they have launched an internal investigation of their own and have suspended Archambault indefinitely. SUNY says they will continue to provide a secure and safe environment for faculty, staff, and students.

SUNY has issued a statement in response.

“We are all deeply disturbed by the alleged crime committed by a SUNY officer. While the criminal investigation is ongoing by the State Police, the officer has been suspended and if he is found to have violated any law or policy, we will pursue immediate termination.”

Archambault is due back in court later this month.

https://spectrumlocalnews.com/nys/capital-region/news/2019/10/16/suny-deputy-police-chief-arrested-on-child-pornography-charges

We’re the police and we are here to help : Separate Georgia cops arrested for sexual assault and armed assault of one officer’s stepfather

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So, who is pulling you over on that dark highway ? Who is that that guy ordering you around with his hand on his gun? Just some guy who decided that  he “Wanted to help people” for a living?     Question : Has a cop ever helped you?  I have had plenty of contact with cops and I can tell you this ; Not once, not ever. I have been interrogated, ticketed, harassed and told multiple times that I am on my own. Every time I have ever called the Cops they have had no resolution for the situation at hand.     So what would we do without these thugs, these most noted members of the thin blue line?  Descend into Anarchy? Probably. I Don’t know about you but I don’t kill or steal because of cops; it’s what keeps me in check.  The Large brown line is more like it.     Stay safe kids and remember that any encounter with LEO can end with the end of your freedom or life.

 

 

” Two northwest Georgia police officers have been arrested following separate GBI investigations.

Ringgold police Officer Blake Ballew, 27, is facing charges out of Catoosa County on allegations he sexually assaulted a woman. Steven Andrew Thornton, 27, was fired from the Cohutta Police Department after what police said was an alcohol-fueled fight with his former stepfather that ended in gunfire.

Ballew was arrested Monday, according to the GBI. The agency opened an investigation Thursday after a woman walked into the Varnell Police Department to file a report against him.

“After interviews, review of the physical evidence, and consulting with the Lookout Mountain District Attorney’s Office, the GBI obtained warrants for the arrest of Officer Ballew,”Joe Montgomery, special agent in charge, said in a news release.

Ballew was arrested on charges of aggravated sexual assault, violation of oath of office and false imprisonment. It is unclear if Ballew was on duty when investigators believe the alleged assault took place.

He was booked into jail in Catoosa County on Monday. According to online jail records, he was released the same day.

Ballew’s employment status was not clear.

Thornton was in between shifts when he was arrested Saturday morning in southern Whitfield County. The GBI determined he was not acting in his official capacity as a police officer, but Cohutta police Chief Greg Fowler decided to fire him anyway.

His employment was terminated hours later, Cohutta Mayor Ron Shinnick said. The city has submitted their reports to the Georgia POST Council, the state agency charged with regulating and certifying police.

According to an incident report obtained by AJC.com, Thornton got into a fight with mother’s ex-husband, Tramell Putnam, after Putnam drove another woman home from a bar. The group had all been drinking together, a witness told Whitfield County sheriff’s deputies.

Thornton confronted Putnam when the man returned home, and he told Thornton to “sleep it off.” A scuffle ensued, and the witness said he saw Thornton put a gun to Putnam’s side before firing a round into the floor.

The former officer claimed his stepfather threatened to kill him and put him in a chokehold. He told deputies he fired the gun as a scare tactic after he began to lose consciousness.

Thornton was arrested on charges of aggravated assault, discharging a firearm while under the influence of alcohol, and possession of a weapon during the commission of a crime. He was being held Monday in the Whitfield County Jail in lieu of $20,000 bond.”

https://www.ajc.com/news/crime–law/just-north-georgia-officers-arrested-after-gbi-investigations/0MY0n6UbmzQnjTxtqKn8jO/

Who’s pulling you over? : Wash. police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

    It begs the question; What the hell is wrong with this guy? Well, I think it is self evident that someone doesn’t wake up one day and say that they want to spend their working career controlling others.    What type of person wants to be the cop? In My graduating class it was all of the bullies. You know, the guys who only wanted to prey on people weaker than themselves. They would never stand up in a fair fight if the odds weren’t stacked in their favor.    I don’t think it is coincidence that cops are 2 to 4 times more likely to commit domestic battery (And half as likely to be prosecuted) * (1)    So, what the Hell is wrong with this guy?  Well do the math and really wonder the next time you see cherries lighting up your dashboard ” Who’s pulling me over ?”

RENTON, Wash. — New court documents are giving more details about what led up to a Renton police officer being arrested in Des Moines early Saturday morning.

King County prosecutors officially filed charges of assault and abuse of office against Officer Tanuj Soni.

The victim told investigators Soni texted her to meet him before dawn Saturday saying he wanted to talk about a case involving her ex-boyfriend.

When a friend dropped her off, the victim says Soni was waiting with a bottle of wine and two cups.

The victim says they spent a couple of hours drinking. During that time, she says Soni deleted some messages on her phone and told her to take off her clothes.

The victim says she willingly did that but then Soni started hitting her and that’s when she tried to get out of the situation.

Just before 6 a.m., the victim managed to run to a nearby home where she contacted authorities. Prosecutors asked a judge for $100,000 bail on concerns about the accusations against Soni. They added that Soni may have covered his tracks when the victim accused him of deleting messages off her phone.”

Renton police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

 

Who’s pulling you over? Compilation of cops busted for child porn 2019

Scumbag cop arrested in Florida for planting drugs on drivers

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“Authorities in Florida have arrested a former sheriff’s deputy after an investigation found he routinely pulled over drivers for minor traffic infractions and then arrested them after planting drugs inside their vehicles, officials said.

The Florida Department of Law Enforcement said in a release that agents arrested 26-year-old Zachary Wester on Wednesday morning on felony charges of racketeering, official misconduct, fabricating evidence, possession of a controlled substance and false imprisonment.

The former sheriff’s deputy was also charged with misdemeanor perjury, possession of a controlled substance and possession of drug paraphernalia.

The office said the arrest came as a result of an investigation it launched at the request of the Jackson County Sheriff’s Office last year.

“The investigation shows Wester routinely pulled over citizens for alleged minor traffic infractions, planted drugs inside their vehicles and arrested them on fabricated drug charges,” the department said. “Wester circumvented JCSO’s body camera policy and tailored his recordings to conceal his criminal activity.”

https://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/452492-florida-deputy-arrested-on-charges-that-he-planted-drugs-on

Who’s pulling you over? 24 Dallas cops, 72 Philly cops and 22 St.Louis cops disciplined or removed from duty after social media posts exposed.

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Please make the case that this is still “Just a few bad apples”. Read the below and then tell me that my assessment of cops is wrong.   Racist , scumbag, power mongers and bullies paid for on our dime.Not just that, they are supported by corrupt judges and prosecutors who profit off of their misdeeds.    The whole stinking system is corrupt and needs to be brought to the ground.  With groups like the plain view project (who brought this to light) and the Video age, it is going to happen sooner rather than later.     As Joe Gamaldi, Houston police union president so aptly said “We’ll be keepin’ an eye on all of Y’all”

” Researchers obtained rosters of police officers and then looked them up on Facebook, according to the project’s website.

After examining the profiles to confirm they belonged to police officers, they reviewed public posts and comments to see if they would “undermine public trust and confidence in police.”

So far, two police departments, one sheriff’s office and one circuit attorney’s office have announced they are taking action:

Dallas

On Thursday, Dallas Police Sgt. Warren Mitchell announced the department was conducting an internal investigation as a result of The Plain View Project, “to determine if the officers violated the Department’s Social Media Policy, or any other departmental policy.”

Mitchell said the department is working with the project’s founder to obtain the list of names and posts by employees connected to Dallas police. The internal inquiry’s findings will be made public, Mitchell said.

“We take these matters seriously and we want to ensure the community that we will not tolerate racism, bigotry or hatred of any kind in our organization.”

 

Philadelphia

Philadelphia police said it had taken 72 police officers off the street and placed them on administrative duty pending an internal investigation into posts that included Confederate imagery, anti-Muslim sentiments, violent rhetoric and racist comments.

An independent law firm is assisting in the investigation, per Philadelphia Police Commissioner Richard Ross. Each post will be examined to see if the speech is constitutionally protected by the First Amendment, he said. If it is found to be protected, “no further action will be taken.”

The department will also review its social media policies and consult the Anti-Defamation League.

The Philadelphia Fraternal Order of Police Lodge #5’s President John McNesby said in a statement that the officers “are entitled to due process just like any other citizen.”

“Far too many officers have been taken off the street during a time of increased violence in our city,” he added.

St. Louis

St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kimberly M. Gardner’s office announced 22 officers would be barred from bringing their cases to her office as a result of posts that came to light in the Plain View Project.

Cases in which these officers serve as primary witnesses are not currently being prosecuted, according to spokeswoman Susan C. Ryan, but it’s unclear how many cases that affects.

“When a police officer’s integrity is compromised in this manner, it compromises the entire criminal justice system and our overall ability to pursue justice,” Gardner said in a news release.

“After careful examination of the underlying bias contained in those social media posts, we have concluded that this bias would likely influence an officer’s ability to perform his or her duties in an unbiased manner.”

Excerpted from here: https://www.click2houston.com/news/national/police-agencies-across-us-take-action-on-officers-offensive-posts

Who’s pulling you over? Who are the soldiers of the police state?

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Posted by Deborah Lee Jarrett

Seriously, who is the person who is pulling over? You know nothing about them or their moral character. All you know is that your heart rate jumped to 120 when you saw lights in your rear view. This person has a badge and a gun and is backed by plenty of other cops and the court system.    Your freedom and life , from the very first moment you interact with them, are at risk. Just because they are sworn officers of the court and enforcers of the law, does not cover the character flaws that drive so many to enter law enforcement. Many are people with issues of control and power. These issues show in their professional interactions and often spill over into their personal lives.  For example:

National center for women  and policing

“Two studies have found that at least 40% of police officer families experience domestic violence, (1, 2) in contrast to 10% of families in the general population.(3) A third study of older and more experienced officers found a rate of 24% (4), indicating that domestic violence is 2-4 times more common among police families than American families in general. A police department that has domestic violence offenders among its ranks will not effectively serve and protect victims in the community.5, 6, 7, 8 Moreover, when officers know of domestic violence committed by their colleagues and seek to protect them by covering it up, they expose the department to civil liability.7

Domestic violence is always a terrible crime, but victims of a police officer are particularly vulnerable because the officer who is abusing them:

  • has a gun,
  • knows the location of battered women’s shelters, and
  • knows how to manipulate the system to avoid penalty and/or shift blame to the victim.5, 6

Victims often fear calling the police, because they know the case will be handled by officers who are colleagues and/or friends of their abuser. Victims of police family violence typically fear that the responding officers will side with their abuser and fail to properly investigate or document the crime.5, 7

These suspicions are well founded, as most departments across the country typically handle cases of police family violence informally, often without an official report, investigation, or even check of the victim’s safety.5, 8, 9 This “informal” method is often in direct contradiction to legislative mandates and departmental policies regarding the appropriate response to domestic violence crimes. Moreover, a 1994 nationwide survey of 123 police departments documented that almost half (45%) had no specific policy for dealing with officer-involved domestic violence. In that same study:

  • The most common discipline imposed for a sustained allegation of domestic violence was counseling.
  • Only 19% of the departments indicated that officers would be terminated after a second sustained allegation of domestic violence.9
  • A recent study of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department found inconsistent policies and practices for officers accused of domestic violence, regarding arrests, seizure of firearms, and Employee Assistance treatment.10 There is no reason to believe that the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department is unique in this; rather, this inconsistency is typical for police agencies responding to domestic violence committed by its own members.

Although the International Association of Chiefs of Police have prepared a model policy on police officer-involved domestic violence, there is no evidence that police departments across the country are doing anything other than simply including the policy in their manuals.

The reality is that even officers who are found guilty of domestic violence are unlikely to be fired, arrested, or referred for prosecution, raising concern that those who are tasked with enforcing the law cannot effectively police themselves.5, 6, 7 For example:

  • In 1998-1999, 23 domestic violence complaints were filed against Boston police employees, but none resulted in criminal prosecution.6
  • The San Diego City Attorney typically prosecutes 92% of the domestic violence cases that are referred, but only 42% of the cases involving a police officer as the perpetrator are prosecuted.11
  • Between 1990 and 1997, the Los Angles Police Department investigated 227 cases of alleged domestic violence by officers, of which 91 were sustained. Of these 91 allegations that were sustained by the department, only 4 resulted in a criminal conviction. That means that the LAPD itself determined in 91 cases that an officer had committed domestic violence, but only 4 were convicted on a criminal charge. Moreover, of these 4 officers who were convicted on a criminal charge of domestic violence, one was suspended for only 15 days and another had his conviction expunged.12

In fact, an in-depth investigation of the Los Angeles Police Department conducted by the Office of the Inspector General concluded that the discipline imposed on officers found guilty of domestic violence “was exceedingly light when the facts of each incident were examined” (p. i).12

The study of the Los Angeles Police Department further examined the 91 cases in which an allegation of domestic violence was sustained against an officer.

  • Over three-fourths of the time, this sustained allegation was not mentioned in the officer’s performance evaluation.
  • Twenty-six of these officers (29%) were promoted, including six who were promoted within two years of the incident.

The report concluded that “employees with sustained allegations were neither barred from moving to desired positions nor transferred out of assignments that were inconsistent with the sustained allegation” (p. iii).12

In 1997, the Los Angeles Office of the Inspector General conducted an investigation of the LAPD after a legal consultant named Bob Mullally leaked shocking LAPD personnel files to the press. These files documented scores of violent domestic crimes committed by LAPD officers. Mullally was so shocked by the LAPD’s mishandling of this police family violence that he decided to violate the civil protective order in the case he was working on and turn the files over to the media, in the hopes of creating change in the LAPD.

  • Rather than reviewing the problem or recommending improvements, the LAPD sued Mullally for leaking the information.
  • In 2002, after multiple appeals, Mullally was sentenced to 45 days in federal prison. None of the police officers he exposed were ever prosecuted for their crimes, and many continue to serve as gun-carrying LAPD officers.
    Even the prosecutor in the case stated on record that this sentence was “extreme” for a violation of a civil protective order.
  • Mullally is the first person in United States history to ever serve a jail term for this type of violation. He served his time in 2003, 6 years after he exposed the files.

More at the original : http://womenandpolicing.com/violenceFS.asp#notes

  • Footnotes

    1 Johnson, L.B. (1991). On the front lines: Police stress and family well-being. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families House of Representatives: 102 Congress First Session May 20 (p. 32-48). Washington DC: US Government Printing Office.

    2 Neidig, P.H., Russell, H.E. & Seng, A.F. (1992). Interspousal aggression in law enforcement families: A preliminary investigation. Police Studies, Vol. 15 (1), p. 30-38.

    3 Straus, M. & Gelles, R. (1990). Physical violence in American families – risk factors and adaptations to violence in 8,145 families. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

    4 P.H. Neidig, A.F. Seng, and H.E. Russell, “Interspousal Aggression in Law Enforcement Personnel Attending the FOP Biennial Conference,” National FOP Journal. Fall/Winter 1992, 25-28.

    5 Levinson, A. (June 29, 1997). Abusers behind a badge. Arizona Republic.

    6 Police departments fail to arrest policemen for wife abuse (November 15, 1998). The Boston Globe.

    7 Feltgen, J. (October, 1996). Domestic violence: When the abuser is a police officer. The Police Chief, p. 42-49.

    8 Lott, L.D. (November, 1995). Deadly secrets: Violence in the police family. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, p. 12-16.

    9 Arlington, Texas Police Department and Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute (1995). Domestic assaults among police: A survey of internal affairs policies. Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute.

    10 Cassidy, M., Nicholl, C.G. & Ross, C.R. (2001). Results of a Survey Conducted by the Metropolitan Police Department of Victims who Reported Violence Against Women. Executive Summary published by the DC Metropolitan Police Department.

    11 Thornton, K. (May 11, 1998). Police and domestic violence. San Diego Union-Tribune.

    12 Domestic Violence Task Force (1997). Domestic Violence in the Los Angeles Police Department: How Well Does the Los Angeles Police Department Police Its Own? Office of the Inspector General.

    13 Omnibus Appropriations Bill (H.R. 4278), Section 658.

    14 Kime, R.C. (December, 1996). New federal gun ban tied to domestic violence convictions. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    15 Culp, M.H. (March, 2000). Officer-involved orders for protection: A management challenge. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    16 Ed Meyer et al. (1999, December 5). Few lose jobs. Akron Beacon Journal.

    17 Model policy overlooks views of Chicago’s in-house expert (April 30, 1998). Law Enforcement News, p. 9.

    18 Tobar, H. (May 26, 1997). Officer’s expunged conviction angers ex-wife. Los Angeles Times.

    19 Tobar, H. (May 9, 1997). 3 Deputies go to court, regain right to carry guns. Los Angeles Times.

    20 Records deleted in assault case involving Louisville policeman. (November 1, 2001). Louisville Courier Journal.