Who’s pulling you over?: Hundreds if not thousands of lying, crooked cops allowed to keep their jobs and still testify in court

 

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If you still believe that this is just a few bad apples then you are either a fool or a cop. Every week I peruse hundreds of stories about bad cops to post just one on this site.    For every article posted on this website I have passed on dozens of others that are current and relevant.    Lot of work, huh? Well that is what happens when a cop lies and the result is jail time for an innocent citizen. When self righteous, a person will go a long way to expose the corruption of those that persecuted them.    At one time I actually believed that whole ” Few bad apples” thing myself. Not any more. Because of misdeeds of various police officers, they have firmly put me in the camp opposite of theirs.  Nice job guys, keep up the good work.

Revat Vara should not have gone to prison.

One night in 2006, Houston police pulled him over for a missing license plate and told him to walk a straight line.

Vara said that he hadn’t had a drop to drink and that he passed the sobriety test. Officer William Lindsey said otherwise.

At trial, jurors were told about Lindsey’s expertise evaluating drunken drivers. They were told about Vara’s two previous DWIs.

What jurors weren’t told: Officer Lindsey had been found guilty of misconduct by his department 35 times. He was investigated for padding his overtime – by manipulating DWI arrests so he would have to be called to testify – among many other violations.  ”

“In a case that came down to one man’s word against another’s, jurors believed the police officer. Because of his prior offenses, Vara was sentenced to 25 years in prison.

What happened to Vara has been unconstitutional for more than 50 years.

The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in 1963 that prosecutors must tell anyone accused of a crime about all evidence that might help their defense at trial. That includes sharing details about police officers who have committed crimes, lied on the job or whose honesty has been called into doubt.

A USA TODAY Network investigation found that widespread failure by police departments and prosecutors to track problem officers makes it impossible to disclose that information to people whose freedom hinges on the integrity of law enforcement.

Reporters for USA TODAY and its partners, including the Chicago-based Invisible Institute, spent more than a year gathering Brady lists from police and prosecutors in thousands of counties to measure compliance with the landmark 1963 ruling in Brady v. Maryland.

The investigation found:

  • Thousands of people have faced criminal charges or gone to prison based in part on testimony from law enforcement officers deemed to have credibility problems by their bosses or by prosecutors.
  • At least 300 prosecutors’ offices across the nation are not taking steps necessary to comply with the Supreme Court mandates. These places do not have a list tracking dishonest or otherwise untrustworthy officers. They include big cities such as Chicago and Little Rock and smaller communities such as Jackson County, Minnesota, and Columbia County, Pennsylvania.
  • In many places that keep lists, police and prosecutors refuse to make them public, making it impossible to know whether they are following the law.
  • Others keep lists that are incomplete. USA TODAY identified at least 1,200 officers with proven histories of lying and other serious misconduct who had not been flagged by prosecutors. Of those officers, 261 were specifically disciplined for dishonesty on the job.”
  • The rest at USA Today here: https://www.usatoday.com/in-depth/news/investigations/2019/10/14/brady-lists-police-officers-dishonest-corrupt-still-testify-investigation-database/2233386001/

Who’s pulling you over? : Top Philadelphia police commander accused of sexually assaulting officers he mentored

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Wow! This is great stuff; it contains all the elements that make a cop a cop. (1.) A need for power and control over others (2.) Moral Corruption and the belief that he is above the law (3.) The need for vindictive prosecution when he doesn’t get his way. (4) (5) (6) Lie! Lie! Lie!   Remember this high ranking officer and what he was willing to do to one of his own the next time a guy with a gun ,a badge and handcuffs pulls you over.  Good luck……. Stay safe and stay away from any “Heroes in blue” Your life or freedom may well depend on it.

By Ray Sanchez and Mirna Alsharif, CNN

(CNN) — Philadelphia Police Chief Inspector Carl Holmes has been arrested and charged with sexually assaulting three female officers to whom he presented himself as a mentor, according to prosecutors.

Holmes, 54, one of the highest ranking members of the department, allegedly used his position to insulate himself against the allegations, which resulted in internal affairs investigations against his accusers, a grand jury presentment said.

“All three women testified about the extent to which (Philadelphia Police Department) culture discourages reporting a fellow officer, especially a boss,” the document said. “Doing so can leave you vulnerable, and on the wrong side of the blue line.”

The case comes two months after Richard Ross Jr. stepped down as commissioner of one of the country’s largest police departments amid allegations of sexual harassment and gender and racial discrimination within the force.

Holmes was arrested Thursday after a grand jury recommended criminal charges that included aggravated indecent assault, indecent assault, attempted involuntary deviate sexual intercourse and other sex offenses, the department said in a statement.”

” The alleged crimes occurred between 2004 and 2007, according to the presentment.

Holmes over the years “developed relationships with new recruits and young female police officers” through his rank and position at the training academy and presented “himself as a safe resource or mentor,” the Philadelphia district attorney’s office said in a statement.

Holmes allegedly “came on to” two female officers who had sought “guidance and mentorship” from him, and “against their will and without their consent kissed them, fondled their breasts, and digitally penetrated” them in a police department office, according to the court document.

In the first case, in the summer of 2004, the officer sought Holmes’ help after she was sexually harassed and stalked by her supervisor, the document said.

Holmes told the officer that he was friends with her supervisor and warned that she should “prepare for a fight” if she decided to file an Equal Employment Opportunity claim against the man, according to the presentment.

Near the end of the meeting, Holmes allegedly grabbed the officer, lifted her onto his desk and “started trying to kiss (her), trying to force his tongue into her mouth. kissing down her neck, and groping her breasts,” the court document said.

When the officer pleaded with him, swearing not to say anything if he let her go, Holmes allegedly told her that “no one would believe some little b—- like her anyway” and that he “could make her disappear,” according to the presentment. At one point, Holmes allegedly pushed “one of his fingers inside her vagina” before she managed to get away.

Weeks after filing a complaint against the supervisor, the officer was was arrested after “abandoned drugs were found and seized from her trash can while it was on the street, outside her home,” the document said. She was investigated by internal affairs for nearly three years for associating with drug dealers — an allegation later deemed unfounded.”

https://www.cbs58.com/news/top-philadelphia-police-commander-accused-of-sexually-assaulting-officers-he-mentored

Who’s pulling you over? : Cop accidentally shoots and kills 73 old wannabe C.OP. during”Shoot, don’t shoot exercise”

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And this genius, whether just stupid or evil may be pulling you over on a dark highway or questioning you on a sidewalk.   This genius may be questioning your 14 r. old child about a burglary in your neighborhood while “Under suspicion.  Worst of all, this genius may be trying to teach your grandmother how to make breakfast or keep your neighborhood safe.    Blue? Not a hero; Maybe a dumbass, maybe a criminal, most certainly someone who wants to be in power.  Sorry Grandma.

 

“PUNTA GORDA, Fla. (AP) – Prosecutors in southwest Florida have filed charges against an officer who accidentally shot a woman to death during a citizens academy “shoot/don’t shoot” exercise, as well as the officer’s boss.

State Attorney Stephen Russell announced Wednesday that Punta Gorda Police Officer Lee Coel has been charged with felony manslaughter and faces up to 30 years in prison. Police Chief Tom Lewis has been charged with misdemeanor culpable negligence and faces up to 60 days in jail.

Authorities say 73-year-old Mary Knowlton was taking part in a roleplaying scenario Aug. 9 when she was mistakenly struck with a live round. The retired librarian was taken to a hospital, where she was pronounced dead.”

https://www.kaaltv.com/news/officer-chief-charged-mary-knowlton-austin/4407972/

 

Who’s pulling you over? : Wash. police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

    It begs the question; What the hell is wrong with this guy? Well, I think it is self evident that someone doesn’t wake up one day and say that they want to spend their working career controlling others.    What type of person wants to be the cop? In My graduating class it was all of the bullies. You know, the guys who only wanted to prey on people weaker than themselves. They would never stand up in a fair fight if the odds weren’t stacked in their favor.    I don’t think it is coincidence that cops are 2 to 4 times more likely to commit domestic battery (And half as likely to be prosecuted) * (1)    So, what the Hell is wrong with this guy?  Well do the math and really wonder the next time you see cherries lighting up your dashboard ” Who’s pulling me over ?”

RENTON, Wash. — New court documents are giving more details about what led up to a Renton police officer being arrested in Des Moines early Saturday morning.

King County prosecutors officially filed charges of assault and abuse of office against Officer Tanuj Soni.

The victim told investigators Soni texted her to meet him before dawn Saturday saying he wanted to talk about a case involving her ex-boyfriend.

When a friend dropped her off, the victim says Soni was waiting with a bottle of wine and two cups.

The victim says they spent a couple of hours drinking. During that time, she says Soni deleted some messages on her phone and told her to take off her clothes.

The victim says she willingly did that but then Soni started hitting her and that’s when she tried to get out of the situation.

Just before 6 a.m., the victim managed to run to a nearby home where she contacted authorities. Prosecutors asked a judge for $100,000 bail on concerns about the accusations against Soni. They added that Soni may have covered his tracks when the victim accused him of deleting messages off her phone.”

Renton police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

 

Who’s pulling you over? Compilation of cops busted for child porn 2019

Who’s pulling you over? Who are the soldiers of the police state?

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Posted by Deborah Lee Jarrett

Seriously, who is the person who is pulling over? You know nothing about them or their moral character. All you know is that your heart rate jumped to 120 when you saw lights in your rear view. This person has a badge and a gun and is backed by plenty of other cops and the court system.    Your freedom and life , from the very first moment you interact with them, are at risk. Just because they are sworn officers of the court and enforcers of the law, does not cover the character flaws that drive so many to enter law enforcement. Many are people with issues of control and power. These issues show in their professional interactions and often spill over into their personal lives.  For example:

National center for women  and policing

“Two studies have found that at least 40% of police officer families experience domestic violence, (1, 2) in contrast to 10% of families in the general population.(3) A third study of older and more experienced officers found a rate of 24% (4), indicating that domestic violence is 2-4 times more common among police families than American families in general. A police department that has domestic violence offenders among its ranks will not effectively serve and protect victims in the community.5, 6, 7, 8 Moreover, when officers know of domestic violence committed by their colleagues and seek to protect them by covering it up, they expose the department to civil liability.7

Domestic violence is always a terrible crime, but victims of a police officer are particularly vulnerable because the officer who is abusing them:

  • has a gun,
  • knows the location of battered women’s shelters, and
  • knows how to manipulate the system to avoid penalty and/or shift blame to the victim.5, 6

Victims often fear calling the police, because they know the case will be handled by officers who are colleagues and/or friends of their abuser. Victims of police family violence typically fear that the responding officers will side with their abuser and fail to properly investigate or document the crime.5, 7

These suspicions are well founded, as most departments across the country typically handle cases of police family violence informally, often without an official report, investigation, or even check of the victim’s safety.5, 8, 9 This “informal” method is often in direct contradiction to legislative mandates and departmental policies regarding the appropriate response to domestic violence crimes. Moreover, a 1994 nationwide survey of 123 police departments documented that almost half (45%) had no specific policy for dealing with officer-involved domestic violence. In that same study:

  • The most common discipline imposed for a sustained allegation of domestic violence was counseling.
  • Only 19% of the departments indicated that officers would be terminated after a second sustained allegation of domestic violence.9
  • A recent study of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department found inconsistent policies and practices for officers accused of domestic violence, regarding arrests, seizure of firearms, and Employee Assistance treatment.10 There is no reason to believe that the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department is unique in this; rather, this inconsistency is typical for police agencies responding to domestic violence committed by its own members.

Although the International Association of Chiefs of Police have prepared a model policy on police officer-involved domestic violence, there is no evidence that police departments across the country are doing anything other than simply including the policy in their manuals.

The reality is that even officers who are found guilty of domestic violence are unlikely to be fired, arrested, or referred for prosecution, raising concern that those who are tasked with enforcing the law cannot effectively police themselves.5, 6, 7 For example:

  • In 1998-1999, 23 domestic violence complaints were filed against Boston police employees, but none resulted in criminal prosecution.6
  • The San Diego City Attorney typically prosecutes 92% of the domestic violence cases that are referred, but only 42% of the cases involving a police officer as the perpetrator are prosecuted.11
  • Between 1990 and 1997, the Los Angles Police Department investigated 227 cases of alleged domestic violence by officers, of which 91 were sustained. Of these 91 allegations that were sustained by the department, only 4 resulted in a criminal conviction. That means that the LAPD itself determined in 91 cases that an officer had committed domestic violence, but only 4 were convicted on a criminal charge. Moreover, of these 4 officers who were convicted on a criminal charge of domestic violence, one was suspended for only 15 days and another had his conviction expunged.12

In fact, an in-depth investigation of the Los Angeles Police Department conducted by the Office of the Inspector General concluded that the discipline imposed on officers found guilty of domestic violence “was exceedingly light when the facts of each incident were examined” (p. i).12

The study of the Los Angeles Police Department further examined the 91 cases in which an allegation of domestic violence was sustained against an officer.

  • Over three-fourths of the time, this sustained allegation was not mentioned in the officer’s performance evaluation.
  • Twenty-six of these officers (29%) were promoted, including six who were promoted within two years of the incident.

The report concluded that “employees with sustained allegations were neither barred from moving to desired positions nor transferred out of assignments that were inconsistent with the sustained allegation” (p. iii).12

In 1997, the Los Angeles Office of the Inspector General conducted an investigation of the LAPD after a legal consultant named Bob Mullally leaked shocking LAPD personnel files to the press. These files documented scores of violent domestic crimes committed by LAPD officers. Mullally was so shocked by the LAPD’s mishandling of this police family violence that he decided to violate the civil protective order in the case he was working on and turn the files over to the media, in the hopes of creating change in the LAPD.

  • Rather than reviewing the problem or recommending improvements, the LAPD sued Mullally for leaking the information.
  • In 2002, after multiple appeals, Mullally was sentenced to 45 days in federal prison. None of the police officers he exposed were ever prosecuted for their crimes, and many continue to serve as gun-carrying LAPD officers.
    Even the prosecutor in the case stated on record that this sentence was “extreme” for a violation of a civil protective order.
  • Mullally is the first person in United States history to ever serve a jail term for this type of violation. He served his time in 2003, 6 years after he exposed the files.

More at the original : http://womenandpolicing.com/violenceFS.asp#notes

  • Footnotes

    1 Johnson, L.B. (1991). On the front lines: Police stress and family well-being. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families House of Representatives: 102 Congress First Session May 20 (p. 32-48). Washington DC: US Government Printing Office.

    2 Neidig, P.H., Russell, H.E. & Seng, A.F. (1992). Interspousal aggression in law enforcement families: A preliminary investigation. Police Studies, Vol. 15 (1), p. 30-38.

    3 Straus, M. & Gelles, R. (1990). Physical violence in American families – risk factors and adaptations to violence in 8,145 families. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

    4 P.H. Neidig, A.F. Seng, and H.E. Russell, “Interspousal Aggression in Law Enforcement Personnel Attending the FOP Biennial Conference,” National FOP Journal. Fall/Winter 1992, 25-28.

    5 Levinson, A. (June 29, 1997). Abusers behind a badge. Arizona Republic.

    6 Police departments fail to arrest policemen for wife abuse (November 15, 1998). The Boston Globe.

    7 Feltgen, J. (October, 1996). Domestic violence: When the abuser is a police officer. The Police Chief, p. 42-49.

    8 Lott, L.D. (November, 1995). Deadly secrets: Violence in the police family. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, p. 12-16.

    9 Arlington, Texas Police Department and Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute (1995). Domestic assaults among police: A survey of internal affairs policies. Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute.

    10 Cassidy, M., Nicholl, C.G. & Ross, C.R. (2001). Results of a Survey Conducted by the Metropolitan Police Department of Victims who Reported Violence Against Women. Executive Summary published by the DC Metropolitan Police Department.

    11 Thornton, K. (May 11, 1998). Police and domestic violence. San Diego Union-Tribune.

    12 Domestic Violence Task Force (1997). Domestic Violence in the Los Angeles Police Department: How Well Does the Los Angeles Police Department Police Its Own? Office of the Inspector General.

    13 Omnibus Appropriations Bill (H.R. 4278), Section 658.

    14 Kime, R.C. (December, 1996). New federal gun ban tied to domestic violence convictions. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    15 Culp, M.H. (March, 2000). Officer-involved orders for protection: A management challenge. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    16 Ed Meyer et al. (1999, December 5). Few lose jobs. Akron Beacon Journal.

    17 Model policy overlooks views of Chicago’s in-house expert (April 30, 1998). Law Enforcement News, p. 9.

    18 Tobar, H. (May 26, 1997). Officer’s expunged conviction angers ex-wife. Los Angeles Times.

    19 Tobar, H. (May 9, 1997). 3 Deputies go to court, regain right to carry guns. Los Angeles Times.

    20 Records deleted in assault case involving Louisville policeman. (November 1, 2001). Louisville Courier Journal.

Who’s pulling you over? : Idaho County Sheriff’s Office deputy fired following his arrest on multiple counts of underage sex charges

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You should feel perfectly safe being pulled over on a dark ,deserted highway by a man with a gun and handcuffs. He’s one of the good guys, a hero and he keeps us all safe. He is part of the thin blue line that separates us from anarchy….. Right? Nothing to fear at all ….

” An Idaho County Sheriff’s Office deputy was fired Friday following his arrest on multiple counts of underage sex charges.

According to a press release from Idaho County, Nick Harris was arrested Friday in Siskiyou County, California, on two counts of lewd conduct with a minor under 16-years-old and one count of sexual abuse of a minor under 16-years-old.

Harris, who worked for the sheriff’s office for three years, was placed on paid administrative leave in May as an investigation into the allegations took place. He was in California as the investigation occurred, the release said. The Idaho State Police conducted the investigation.

Harris is being held on a $100,000 bond.”