Who’s pulling you over? : Wash. police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

    It begs the question; What the hell is wrong with this guy? Well, I think it is self evident that someone doesn’t wake up one day and say that they want to spend their working career controlling others.    What type of person wants to be the cop? In My graduating class it was all of the bullies. You know, the guys who only wanted to prey on people weaker than themselves. They would never stand up in a fair fight if the odds weren’t stacked in their favor.    I don’t think it is coincidence that cops are 2 to 4 times more likely to commit domestic battery (And half as likely to be prosecuted) * (1)    So, what the Hell is wrong with this guy?  Well do the math and really wonder the next time you see cherries lighting up your dashboard ” Who’s pulling me over ?”

RENTON, Wash. — New court documents are giving more details about what led up to a Renton police officer being arrested in Des Moines early Saturday morning.

King County prosecutors officially filed charges of assault and abuse of office against Officer Tanuj Soni.

The victim told investigators Soni texted her to meet him before dawn Saturday saying he wanted to talk about a case involving her ex-boyfriend.

When a friend dropped her off, the victim says Soni was waiting with a bottle of wine and two cups.

The victim says they spent a couple of hours drinking. During that time, she says Soni deleted some messages on her phone and told her to take off her clothes.

The victim says she willingly did that but then Soni started hitting her and that’s when she tried to get out of the situation.

Just before 6 a.m., the victim managed to run to a nearby home where she contacted authorities. Prosecutors asked a judge for $100,000 bail on concerns about the accusations against Soni. They added that Soni may have covered his tracks when the victim accused him of deleting messages off her phone.”

Renton police officer charged with assault after allegedly beating woman

 

Who’s pulling you over? Compilation of cops busted for child porn 2019

Who’s pulling you over? Who are the soldiers of the police state?

module-everyday-heroes-right
Posted by Deborah Lee Jarrett

Seriously, who is the person who is pulling over? You know nothing about them or their moral character. All you know is that your heart rate jumped to 120 when you saw lights in your rear view. This person has a badge and a gun and is backed by plenty of other cops and the court system.    Your freedom and life , from the very first moment you interact with them, are at risk. Just because they are sworn officers of the court and enforcers of the law, does not cover the character flaws that drive so many to enter law enforcement. Many are people with issues of control and power. These issues show in their professional interactions and often spill over into their personal lives.  For example:

National center for women  and policing

“Two studies have found that at least 40% of police officer families experience domestic violence, (1, 2) in contrast to 10% of families in the general population.(3) A third study of older and more experienced officers found a rate of 24% (4), indicating that domestic violence is 2-4 times more common among police families than American families in general. A police department that has domestic violence offenders among its ranks will not effectively serve and protect victims in the community.5, 6, 7, 8 Moreover, when officers know of domestic violence committed by their colleagues and seek to protect them by covering it up, they expose the department to civil liability.7

Domestic violence is always a terrible crime, but victims of a police officer are particularly vulnerable because the officer who is abusing them:

  • has a gun,
  • knows the location of battered women’s shelters, and
  • knows how to manipulate the system to avoid penalty and/or shift blame to the victim.5, 6

Victims often fear calling the police, because they know the case will be handled by officers who are colleagues and/or friends of their abuser. Victims of police family violence typically fear that the responding officers will side with their abuser and fail to properly investigate or document the crime.5, 7

These suspicions are well founded, as most departments across the country typically handle cases of police family violence informally, often without an official report, investigation, or even check of the victim’s safety.5, 8, 9 This “informal” method is often in direct contradiction to legislative mandates and departmental policies regarding the appropriate response to domestic violence crimes. Moreover, a 1994 nationwide survey of 123 police departments documented that almost half (45%) had no specific policy for dealing with officer-involved domestic violence. In that same study:

  • The most common discipline imposed for a sustained allegation of domestic violence was counseling.
  • Only 19% of the departments indicated that officers would be terminated after a second sustained allegation of domestic violence.9
  • A recent study of the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department found inconsistent policies and practices for officers accused of domestic violence, regarding arrests, seizure of firearms, and Employee Assistance treatment.10 There is no reason to believe that the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department is unique in this; rather, this inconsistency is typical for police agencies responding to domestic violence committed by its own members.

Although the International Association of Chiefs of Police have prepared a model policy on police officer-involved domestic violence, there is no evidence that police departments across the country are doing anything other than simply including the policy in their manuals.

The reality is that even officers who are found guilty of domestic violence are unlikely to be fired, arrested, or referred for prosecution, raising concern that those who are tasked with enforcing the law cannot effectively police themselves.5, 6, 7 For example:

  • In 1998-1999, 23 domestic violence complaints were filed against Boston police employees, but none resulted in criminal prosecution.6
  • The San Diego City Attorney typically prosecutes 92% of the domestic violence cases that are referred, but only 42% of the cases involving a police officer as the perpetrator are prosecuted.11
  • Between 1990 and 1997, the Los Angles Police Department investigated 227 cases of alleged domestic violence by officers, of which 91 were sustained. Of these 91 allegations that were sustained by the department, only 4 resulted in a criminal conviction. That means that the LAPD itself determined in 91 cases that an officer had committed domestic violence, but only 4 were convicted on a criminal charge. Moreover, of these 4 officers who were convicted on a criminal charge of domestic violence, one was suspended for only 15 days and another had his conviction expunged.12

In fact, an in-depth investigation of the Los Angeles Police Department conducted by the Office of the Inspector General concluded that the discipline imposed on officers found guilty of domestic violence “was exceedingly light when the facts of each incident were examined” (p. i).12

The study of the Los Angeles Police Department further examined the 91 cases in which an allegation of domestic violence was sustained against an officer.

  • Over three-fourths of the time, this sustained allegation was not mentioned in the officer’s performance evaluation.
  • Twenty-six of these officers (29%) were promoted, including six who were promoted within two years of the incident.

The report concluded that “employees with sustained allegations were neither barred from moving to desired positions nor transferred out of assignments that were inconsistent with the sustained allegation” (p. iii).12

In 1997, the Los Angeles Office of the Inspector General conducted an investigation of the LAPD after a legal consultant named Bob Mullally leaked shocking LAPD personnel files to the press. These files documented scores of violent domestic crimes committed by LAPD officers. Mullally was so shocked by the LAPD’s mishandling of this police family violence that he decided to violate the civil protective order in the case he was working on and turn the files over to the media, in the hopes of creating change in the LAPD.

  • Rather than reviewing the problem or recommending improvements, the LAPD sued Mullally for leaking the information.
  • In 2002, after multiple appeals, Mullally was sentenced to 45 days in federal prison. None of the police officers he exposed were ever prosecuted for their crimes, and many continue to serve as gun-carrying LAPD officers.
    Even the prosecutor in the case stated on record that this sentence was “extreme” for a violation of a civil protective order.
  • Mullally is the first person in United States history to ever serve a jail term for this type of violation. He served his time in 2003, 6 years after he exposed the files.

More at the original : http://womenandpolicing.com/violenceFS.asp#notes

  • Footnotes

    1 Johnson, L.B. (1991). On the front lines: Police stress and family well-being. Hearing before the Select Committee on Children, Youth, and Families House of Representatives: 102 Congress First Session May 20 (p. 32-48). Washington DC: US Government Printing Office.

    2 Neidig, P.H., Russell, H.E. & Seng, A.F. (1992). Interspousal aggression in law enforcement families: A preliminary investigation. Police Studies, Vol. 15 (1), p. 30-38.

    3 Straus, M. & Gelles, R. (1990). Physical violence in American families – risk factors and adaptations to violence in 8,145 families. New Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers.

    4 P.H. Neidig, A.F. Seng, and H.E. Russell, “Interspousal Aggression in Law Enforcement Personnel Attending the FOP Biennial Conference,” National FOP Journal. Fall/Winter 1992, 25-28.

    5 Levinson, A. (June 29, 1997). Abusers behind a badge. Arizona Republic.

    6 Police departments fail to arrest policemen for wife abuse (November 15, 1998). The Boston Globe.

    7 Feltgen, J. (October, 1996). Domestic violence: When the abuser is a police officer. The Police Chief, p. 42-49.

    8 Lott, L.D. (November, 1995). Deadly secrets: Violence in the police family. FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, p. 12-16.

    9 Arlington, Texas Police Department and Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute (1995). Domestic assaults among police: A survey of internal affairs policies. Southwestern Law Enforcement Institute.

    10 Cassidy, M., Nicholl, C.G. & Ross, C.R. (2001). Results of a Survey Conducted by the Metropolitan Police Department of Victims who Reported Violence Against Women. Executive Summary published by the DC Metropolitan Police Department.

    11 Thornton, K. (May 11, 1998). Police and domestic violence. San Diego Union-Tribune.

    12 Domestic Violence Task Force (1997). Domestic Violence in the Los Angeles Police Department: How Well Does the Los Angeles Police Department Police Its Own? Office of the Inspector General.

    13 Omnibus Appropriations Bill (H.R. 4278), Section 658.

    14 Kime, R.C. (December, 1996). New federal gun ban tied to domestic violence convictions. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    15 Culp, M.H. (March, 2000). Officer-involved orders for protection: A management challenge. The Police Chief, p. 10.

    16 Ed Meyer et al. (1999, December 5). Few lose jobs. Akron Beacon Journal.

    17 Model policy overlooks views of Chicago’s in-house expert (April 30, 1998). Law Enforcement News, p. 9.

    18 Tobar, H. (May 26, 1997). Officer’s expunged conviction angers ex-wife. Los Angeles Times.

    19 Tobar, H. (May 9, 1997). 3 Deputies go to court, regain right to carry guns. Los Angeles Times.

    20 Records deleted in assault case involving Louisville policeman. (November 1, 2001). Louisville Courier Journal.

Who’s pulling you over? : Idaho County Sheriff’s Office deputy fired following his arrest on multiple counts of underage sex charges

pervert

You should feel perfectly safe being pulled over on a dark ,deserted highway by a man with a gun and handcuffs. He’s one of the good guys, a hero and he keeps us all safe. He is part of the thin blue line that separates us from anarchy….. Right? Nothing to fear at all ….

” An Idaho County Sheriff’s Office deputy was fired Friday following his arrest on multiple counts of underage sex charges.

According to a press release from Idaho County, Nick Harris was arrested Friday in Siskiyou County, California, on two counts of lewd conduct with a minor under 16-years-old and one count of sexual abuse of a minor under 16-years-old.

Harris, who worked for the sheriff’s office for three years, was placed on paid administrative leave in May as an investigation into the allegations took place. He was in California as the investigation occurred, the release said. The Idaho State Police conducted the investigation.

Harris is being held on a $100,000 bond.”

Welcome to the American police state

Thomas Jefferson quote: Experience hath shewn, that even under the best forms of government those entrusted...

Definition of tyranny

1. Oppressive power exerted by government : The tyranny of a police state

When did it become the normal American state to exist in a state of “Diminished liberty” when in public?

When did our liberty fade so far that we cannot drive down the street or walk down the sidewalk without fear of being pulled over, stopped, frisked or searched?

We now live in a virtual police state with heavily armed domestic warriors ruling the public spaces that we occupy

Whether on land, sand or sea, you, and I, are subject at any time to inspection, search questioning or arrest

At any given time, with the amount of laws and regulations on the books, you are most likely in violation of some law

Even worse, with “Proactive policing” you are subject to questioning and a body search simply because an enforcer of the law believes that you might be suspicious.

The lawmakers that rule us have declared, via the supreme court, that during that search, if the heavily armed, bullet proof vested, arm of the local Government, feels threatened, you may be placed in handcuffs while being detained and questioned

That’s right

You as a free American, while having committed no crime, are subject to search, detainment and (for the moment) temporary imprisonment

I say temporary because at that point most anything you do can end with your arrest

For example, if you are vacationing in Florida and are looking at a boat that has floated onto the beach

Under the proactive policing guidelines issued by the U.S. DOJ, a police officer is obligated to investigate you to make sure that a crime is not being, or about (That’s right…About) to be committed

If that officer feels threatened, even if you are a group of middle aged disabled women in swim wear, you will be handcuffed for their safety

(Note: This is based on a true story)

From that point on your freedom is in his , hers, or their hands

In Florida to resist or oppose an officer is a crime punishable by a year in jail and a $5000.00 fine

Below is the statute

843.02 Resisting officer without violence to his or her person.Whoever shall resist, obstruct, or oppose any officer as defined in s. 943.10(1), (2), (3), (6), (7), (8), or (9); member of the Florida Commission on Offender Review or any administrative aide or supervisor employed by the commission; county probation officer; parole and probation supervisor; personnel or representative of the Department of Law Enforcement; or other person legally authorized to execute process in the execution of legal process or in the lawful execution of any legal duty, without offering or doing violence to the person of the officer, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree, punishable as provided in s. 775.082 or s. 775.083.

 

And here is the dictionary definition of resistance

verb (used with object)

1: To withstand, strive against, or oppose
2: To withstand the action or effect of
3: To refrain or abstain from, especially with difficulty or reluctance
But remember this; you are not under arrest, you are simply being questioned about a washed up boat that you are looking at
You could
The charge “resisting arrest” is long gone
Now the charge is “resisting /obstructing”
Simply opposing the officer that is questioning you about a crime that he thinks might be committed (But hasn’t) can end with you being imprisoned for up to a year
So if you are handcuffed, in the Florida sun and in pain because of confinement, be careful not to do anything that could be construed as “Opposing” the officer because “justice is extremely expensive” (1)
Although this is based on a true story that occurred in Florida* , it is not about Florida
It is about the basic human right not to be subject to unreasonable search or seizure
Not the 4th amendment right
That is the right that the Government has granted us
That right comes with limitations that are spelled out by the supreme court
DUI roadblocks, warrant-less cell phone data collection, email interception and many other instances
But the 4th amendment was written into law, not to make it have limitations, but rather to state the basic human right
Once written though, it has given those that rule ample opportunity to make excuses to legally side step it
Can you imagine the men who wrote that thought into a legal document being subjected to it today?
Seriously, The men who stood at Lexington to the withering fire of trained British troops?
The men who authored the Boston Tea party?
Can you picture Samuel Adams or George Washington, pulled from their carriages and handcuffed on the side of the road?
Forced to show their permission from the state to travel and summarily searched?
How have we come so far from freedom and so deeply into the hands of tyranny?
And tyranny it it is
What do you feel when you are driving down the highway and a law enforcer pulls up on your bumper?
Seriously, what?
Fear
Heartbeat
Adrenaline
Fear
And why?
Just a ticket right?
Or maybe not
Maybe more
Why fear?
There is a short and simple answer
Tyranny
The power of the Government is being exerted over you without your consent
Did you vote for a 45MPH speed limit?
Were you represented when it became illegal to tint your windows?
Did you beg “your” lawmakers for drug dogs to search vehicles at routine traffic stops?
For the safety of officers did you consent to being searched and handcuffed?
Tyranny, because any encounter can end with you in prison
Or worse, dead
You are at the hands and mercy of a state backed law enforcer
You hope that he will be lenient
The law right now is up to him
Anything that this law enforcer says in court is given the weight of truth
Because the state is on his side
He is not only the face of the state
But also the income of the sate
If you resisted while in handcuffs
It is because the law enforcer interpreted it that way
And only because the lawmakers that “Represent” you have written laws to make it possible
And you are now going to pay the state thousands of dollars
Fines, court costs, Etc.
All so you can pay for your own loss of freedom
It happens on the local level
The state level
The federal level
It is in its most base form
Tyranny
Resist it at your own risk
* In 2015 a group of disabled women were arrested by Florida Fish and wildlife commission  officers at Honeymoon Island state park in Hillsborough county Florida and detained in handcuffs for hours.  All three were charged with resisting/obstructing for refusing the search of a vehicle that two of them did not own. After filing complaints against FWC, one year later, the arresting officer was changed and the charge was changed. All three were later convicted and one served 30 days in prison.
(1)Leslie M. Sammis, Sammis Law Firm in Tampa, FL

4 Houston cops shot , Update: cops lied on warrant that ended in shooting

Lying bunch of dipshits got their asses shot up because the house they hit never sold them heroin as stated in the warrant.    Mister wannabe hero that lied on the affidavit was one of those wounded in the shooting and I hope he caught a good one.      You should be aware  that anytime you deal with the “Heroes in Blue” that they usually have something to gain by lying . Whether it is monetary, power related or simply to cover their misdeeds, more often than not, they will lie.     Why? Because they are automatically assumed to be telling the truth. A Judge will give the testimony of ” A sworn officer of the court” the weight of truth with no examination.       So why not lie? Why not get promotions, awards and raises when all you have to do is bend the truth?       But it is not just the cops; It is the lawyers, judges, DA’s and everyone else involved.   They all profit from it and build careers, political lives and personal wealth.      If you sit in a court you should really remember this : Before you condemn a fellow citizen, the cop, the prosecutor, the lawyer are just as likely to be committing a crime as they are.     The only reason that this info on Houston came out was the fact that someone leaked the COURT SEALED DOCUMENTS.   Who is the scumbag here? The drug dealers or the cops? Maybe someone should contact Mr. Garabaldi to find out.

cop
Posted by Deborah Jarrett

       Houston — Houston’s police chief says a lead investigator lied in an affidavit justifying a drug raid on a home which ended with two residents killed and four officers wounded in a gun battle. The officer is expected to face charges.

Chief Art Acevedo said during a news conference Friday that the investigator falsely claimed in the affidavit, which was leaked to the media, that a confidential informant obtained heroin from the home. Police records indicate the heroin was actually obtained elsewhere.

Two residents of the home, 59-year-old Dennis Tuttle and 58-year-old Rhogena Nicholas, were killed.

The investigator was one of the officers shot in the gunfight Jan. 28. He remained hospitalized Friday. Officials said he has been with the department for more than 30 years.

In the hours after the deadly raid, Acevedo praised the investigator as being “tough as nails,” but he said Friday that there’s a “high probability that there will be a criminal charge” brought against him.

After the raid, police said they found several firearms at the home, along with marijuana and cocaine but no heroin. Acevedo insisted Friday that investigators did have reason to investigate the home and were not there “willy nilly.” Authorities still believe Tuttle and Nicholas were involved in criminal activity, but Acevedo said the case now is undermined.

He said lying in a sworn affidavit is “totally unacceptable.”

“From day one, when I joined this department, I told my people that if you lie, you die,” Acevedo said.

The leaked affidavit — which had been sealed under a court order — revealed that when police started looking into the investigator’s account, it started to unravel. Still hospitalized with a gunshot wound, the investigator wrote down the name of the confidential informant for another officer investigating questions around the drug raid.

When Houston police contacted the informant, he said he had worked with the investigator on narcotics cases in the past, but not the one that led to the deadly shootout. The informant also said the investigator had paid him in the past even when he didn’t do any work.

The rest of the story is here: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/houston-police-chief-says-investigator-lied-in-affidavit-leading-to-deadly-drug-raid/